Does a healthy lifestyle promote cognitive performance in old age? What new therapeutic approaches can be used to extend the health span in old age? What must the environment look like so that people can age healthy and satisfied? These are just a few examples of the pressing questions that society and politics are currently posing to science. The Leibniz Research Alliance Healthy Ageing wants to provide answers.
  1. Old and Healthy: Researchers Find Novel Genes for Longevity in Mammals
    04/10/2018 · FLI Leibniz Institute on Aging - Fritz Lipmann Institute

    The genetic basis of lifespan determination is poorly understood. Most research has been done on short-lived animals, and it is unclear if these insights can be transferred to long-lived mammals like humans. By comparing genes of long- and short-lived rodents, researchers from Leibniz Institute on Aging (FLI) in Jena/Germany now identified in a collaborative project several novel genes possibly influencing longevity and healthy aging in mammals. The results have been published in journal PLoS Genetics.

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  2. Cognitive impairment in the elderly – What is the role of air pollution and lung function?
    03/19/2018 · IUF Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine

    A study from scientists at IUF – Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine in Düsseldorf, Germany, published in the European Respiratory Journal, indicates that poor lung function is not only a risk factor for cognitive impairment in elderly people but also partially mediates negative effects of air pollution on cognition.

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  3. Additional 5 Million Euro Funding for Aging Research in Jena, Germany
    03/09/2018 · FLI Leibniz Institute on Aging - Fritz Lipmann Institute

    The Leibniz Institute on Aging (FLI) in Jena, Germany, was approved 5 million EUR additional funding by the German Joint Science Conference (Gemeinsame Wissenschaftskonferenz, GWK), which thus implemented a proposal by the Senate of the German Leibniz Association. The funding is to be used to build up a new research focus on “Microbiome and Aging” at the Institute. In parallel, a recruitment effort to fill an associated tenured W3-professorship has already been initiated.

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