Does a healthy lifestyle promote cognitive performance in old age? What new therapeutic approaches can be used to extend the health span in old age? What must the environment look like so that people can age healthy and satisfied? These are just a few examples of the pressing questions that society and politics are currently posing to science. The Leibniz Research Alliance Healthy Ageing wants to provide answers.
  1. Aggressive tumors - New regulator in breast cancer cells discovered
    08/06/2018 · FLI Leibniz Institute on Aging - Fritz Lipmann Institute

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a particularly aggressive form of breast cancer. Here, important receptors are missing, which often serve as targets for treatments. Thus, these tumors are unlikely to respond to current therapies. Researchers from the Leibniz Institute on Aging – Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) in Jena now identified the protein TRPS1, which is commonly overexpressed in these tumors. When TRPS1 is down-regulated, tumor growth decreases whereas survival rates increase. This is a possible therapeutic approach for the treatment of this aggressive form of breast cancer. The results have now been published in the journal Nature Communications.

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  2. Back-to-back: Current Studies on the Longevity of Naked Mole-Rats
    08/02/2018 · FLI Leibniz Institute on Aging - Fritz Lipmann Institute

    Naked mole-rats can live considerably longer than other rodents like mouse, rat or guinea pig. This makes them outliers among mammals, just as humans with their maximum lifespan of about 120 years. The identification of genetic and molecular characteristics that distinguish long-lived from short-lived species enables the identification of naturally evolved mechanisms to a long and healthy life. Researchers of the Leibniz Institute on Aging - Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) together with colleagues of other research institutions now published two back-to-back studies on the longevity of naked mole-rats in the journal BMC Biology.

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  3. Heart Attack and Stroke Risk Also Elevated in Women with Obesity Who Are Metabolically Healthy
    05/31/2018 · DIfE German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrück

    Women with obesity are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, even if they are considered to be metabolically healthy. Moreover, women of normal weight are at risk of heart attack or stroke if they suffer from a metabolic disease such as diabetes or high blood pressure. These are the results of an analysis conducted by scientists of the German Institute of Human Nutrition (DIfE), Harvard University and University Hospital Tübingen based on 90,257 data records of a large U.S. cohort study. The researchers have now published their findings in the journal The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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